This is the writing and research component of our class. I know, I know. This isn’t an English class. It’s a math class! But part of my job in Math 100 is to inspire interest and curiosity in students about mathematics and to show how math is used in the real world by people who study, research, apply and think about mathematics. You’ll be required to watch a total of one hour from a selection of videos at the websites listed below, and to write a 1-2 page paper. There are three options. Pick and choose only one. In your report, include (1) a summary of the videos you watched; (2) which video was the most interesting and why; (3) what you learned that was new; (4) if you use or have used mathematics in your life outside of school such as on the job or in the “real world;” and (5) if you view mathematics differently now that you have seen the videos or completed the Math 100 course.

Your Video Project is due by the end of Week 12 or sooner. To earn the full 50 points it must be shared online at GOOGLE DOCS. It must include some pictures or images, the link must be posted on the Discussion Board so it can be read and commented on by other students, and you must read and comment on three other student’s reports. Please mix up and insert your pictures and images within the report. Don’t just group them all together at the beginning or the end.

Use GOOGLE DOCS to Submit Your Report

Use the Internet and Google Docs to post your Video Project report online. To add to the appearance, increase interest and to get the full 50 points you must include some pictures or images. For best results create your report in Google Docs; do not create it in another program then try to copy and paste it. Make certain you share it with everyone not just other students so we can all open it from any of our accounts. When you’re done click at the left on Discussions > Video Projects to post a link to your report. Then read and comment on at least three other student’s reports. If you have a question please post it on the Discussion Board so I can help everyone. Pick ONE of the options below.
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Option #1 — Loving the world of numbers. A new video is posted at the Numberphile website every week along with regular updates from behind the scenes. It is supported by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI). Each video is about 10-15 minutes long. If you open one and it doesn’t catch your interest, try another one. I’m sure you’ll find a few videos from the team that enlighten and entertain you. Pick enough of the videos to add up to a total viewing time of one hour.

Go to the Numberphile website for more information and links to all the videos.
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Option #2 — Hunting the Hidden Dimension is about fractals which are all around you, and one of the topics we study in the class. Their irregular, repeating shapes are found in cloud formations and tree limbs, in stalks of broccoli and craggy mountain ranges, even in the rhythm of the human heart. In this film, NOVA takes viewers on a fascinating quest with a group of maverick mathematicians determined to decipher the rules that govern fractal geometry.

The one-hour film highlights a host of filmmakers, fashion designers, physicians, and researchers who are using fractal geometry to innovate and inspire. Produced and directed by Emmy- and Peabody Award-winning filmmakers Michael Schwarz and Bill Jersey, the documentary weaves cutting-edge research from the front lines of science into a compelling mathematical detective story.

Go to YouTube and watch it there for free. Warning: There have been some problems with deleted links or incomplete files. This new link is my latest attempt to make the program accessible. Let me know if there’s a problem. Otherwise, I’ll assume it’s working. Thanks!
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Option #3 — Ever feel confused by all the letters and squiggles used by scientists and mathematicians? Hopefully this site will unravel some of those mysteries. Sixty Symbols is a collection of videos about math, physics and astronomy presented by experts from the University of Nottingham in England who are interviewed in a series of short, 5-10 minute videos.

They aren’t lessons or lectures, and the website has never tried to be an online reference book. They are just fun chats with men and women who love their subject and know a lot about it! The important part is the cross-discipline factor. That is, physicists, scientists, astronomers, mathematicians and the average person in the street can all enjoy and learn something from these clips.

Go to the Sixty Symbols home page. Click on and watch enough of the videos to add up to a total viewing time of one hour.